Techniques

Telling a story with less

Posted by on Jun 29, 2016 in Techniques | 1 comment

Telling a story with less

Sometimes I feel that the Painter has an edge over the photographer when it comes to creating within our chosen art. The painter basically starts with a blank canvas and then adds their desired elements until they feel the story is told. As photographers we start with the full scene in front of us and need to remove or reduce elements until the story becomes clear, this can become a significant challenge but is critical to ensure strong impact with the viewer of the photo. When this approach is taken to its pinnacle we move into the area of minimalism in our photography and when done well this technique will yield you great pleasure and can delight those people looking...

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Showing motion in your photos

Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 in Techniques, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Showing motion in your photos

The ability to catch and portray movement in a photo is a critical skill to learn, it can help elevate your photography and provide an engaging focal point for the viewer. The skill when learnt can be easily applied to a wide range of photography but becomes an essential component of sports or action type photos. Ranging from kids playing in the backyard through to pro-surfers or motor racing, exciting and engaging photos can be crafted by controlling the way motion is shown. As a photographer you have a number of options open to you when it comes to showing how things are moving within your photo’s frame and your camera settings become critical to achieving the desired...

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Learning how to review your own photos

Posted by on Mar 23, 2015 in Techniques | 0 comments

Learning how to review your own photos

In the last couple of blog posts I have been discussing how to review other peoples photo and how to accept feedback on your images, this week I would like to talk about learning to review your own photos. In a lot of cases this will actually be the hardest step out of all of the three discussed, as we often need to go beyond our own personal feelings for a photo and look at it with a more critical eye. Learning the ability to review your own photos goes a long way to helping you to improve your photography, it is also essential if you want to enter photography competitions (either through a photography club or a more national style of competition) or entertain any type...

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Learning to accept feedback on your photos

Posted by on Mar 8, 2015 in Techniques | 1 comment

Learning to accept feedback on your photos

A number of weeks ago I wrote a blog post suggesting a number of methods for giving constructive feedback to photographers when asked. This week I am going to look at the reverse side of that discussion, how to gauge and evaluate feedback provided to your photographs. One the key factors to this is that anyone who provides you feedback for a photograph is providing their opinion. This understanding can be a bit of release in some circumstances, because you come to realise that not every opinion has equal weight and an opinion is not right or wrong, it is just an opinion. So when it comes to receiving feedback for your photos here are a couple of things to remember: 1)...

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Learning to review other people’s photos

Posted by on Feb 16, 2015 in Techniques | 0 comments

Learning to review other people’s photos

At some point every photographer is approached by a friend or family member to provide feedback on one of their images. After watching many different judges at camera clubs, I can honestly say that I have seen the good and bad versions of how this is done. You might be surprised to find that learning to provide constructive criticism about other people photos will actually help your own photo taking. Understanding what you see in other peoples photos and how to communicate about that will give you key insights into what would work to improve your photos. So lets examine a few key items that you should consider: 1) Be sure that the questioner is actually looking for...

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When to turn off Image Stabilisation

Posted by on Jan 25, 2015 in Techniques | 3 comments

When to turn off Image Stabilisation

On a recent workshop I was reminded how important it can be to think about checking the small things when it comes to landscape photography. After grabbing a few shots of the Story Bridge for sunset, I looked back up the river and noticed a very nice pattern formed by the new walkway on the river. After trying to frame the image using a 10-20mm lens, I decided to change to my new Sigma 24-105mm lens. I fitted the lens, framed the shot and made the photo. Looking at the back of camera I noticed that the photo was blurry, no problem I thought, I must have bumped the tripod. Tried again with similar results. With my image settings being f10 for 15 secs, keeping the camera...

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